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For Steve Sinofsky, “Apple’s Arm-based Mac will be the ultimate development PC”

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Steven Sinofsky, former director of Microsoft Windows, believes Apple’s new Silicon Mac, based on Arm, will become the “developer’s ultimate PC.” According to him, the move from Apple to Arm is the death knell for Intel and potentially Windows too, with the Arm-based Mac set to become the preferred platform for software developers.

“In two years, there is only Arm hardware and in four Intel will be from the old memory. The ecosystem will have changed. And the Mac will be the ultimate development PC. The iPad will be used more and more for work,” he said in a Twitter post, re-tweeting a comment from renowned developer Steve Troughton-Smith on Arm-based Macs.

Steve Troughton-Smith raised the issue of Apple’s macOS laptops and desktops that are not compatible with the iOS touchscreen. With the move to Arm, the question is whether Apple will release a MacBook or an iMac with a touch screen.

Transferring UI elements from iOS to macOS
Apple’s Universal Quick Start Program offers developers Mac mini hardware with its A12Z Bionic chip, so Apple doesn’t give details on future Mac screens, but macOS 11 Big Sur brings for the first time user interface elements from iOS to macOS.

“I really hope that the transition to Arm is what will allow Apple’s Mac lineup to reach the 120 Hz frequency, facial recognition and touch. There are so many things we take for granted on iOS that give the impression that macOS are broken without them, and with the convergence of software and hardware, it feels like they’re closer than ever,” wrote Steve Troughton-Smith.

Steven Sinofsky agrees on the issue of touchscreens on Macs. “PS: yes a contactless computer is broken,” he wrote. Of course, his judgment is biased, given that he was responsible for Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows RT for Arm-based PCs – the first versions of Windows that allowed interaction with the touchscreen. Steven Sinofsky left Microsoft at the end of 2012, a few weeks after the commercial release of Windows 8 and shortly after the release of Surface RT, Microsoft’s first response to Apple’s iPad, which resulted in a $900 million writedown a year later.

Since leaving Microsoft, Steven Sinofsky has written extensively about the iPhone and iPad and the impact of Microsoft’s Windows activity on software developers.

Two-year horizon
As Steven Sinofsky recalled earlier this year, when former Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced the first iPad in 2010, he called the then-popular Intel Atom-based Netbooks “simple, cheap laptops.” Steven Sinofsky highlighted the dangers of iPad for Windows. “The iPad and iPhone were very real threats to Microsoft’s core business. Without a Microsoft-controlled platform that developers were looking for, the soul of the company was missing,” he wrote. “The PC had been overtaken by browsers, a change that lasted 10 years. PC OEMs were very concerned about the rise of Android and loved the Android model (no PC manufacturer would ultimately be a big Android OEM)”.

Steven Sinofsky praises Apple for making Apple’s silicon chip, the Arm-based chipset for future Macs. Apple plans to complete the transition from Intel’s Mac to Apple’s silicon within the next two years. “What we’re seeing is simply one of the most remarkable product engineering over time in history,” the former Microsoft boss said of Apple’s transition to Arm for Mac.

“My jaw fell when Apple CEO Tim Cook referred to Apple’s silicon transition as a two-year project. On the one hand, it seems very short. On the other hand, the wait is going to be very long, you will have to be patient. »

What sets Apple apart, he says, is that the Apple firm has its own vision for the future of technology. “Apple is a company that has a point of view, and when the point of view aligns with a great product that people love, it can become an unstoppable force.” Apple is ready to entrust its partners and ecosystem members to new ones, in an effort to maintain its strategy. “It’s a key benefit to have engaged consumers, because consumers are replacing devices on their own.”

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